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PART III - The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space

PART III - The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space

PART III - The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space

Sky Factory
Sky Factory
on behalf of The British Institute of Interior Design

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Launch date: 25 Mar 2019
Expiry Date: 29 Apr 2022

Last updated: 16 Aug 2019

Reference: 190510

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(18 Apr 2019)
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Description

In the concluding segment of our course, we discuss human perception and spatial design in relation to clinical environments. Whereas studies have shown that nature imagery brings an element of positive distraction to enclosed interiors, until cutting-edge research by Sky Factory, Texas Tech University, and Covenant Health, no one had explored the restorative benefits of multisensory sky images.

When photographic sky images are designed to proper scale and perspective, in addition to about 20 other design and compositional elements, the resultant multisensory images contain strong spatial cues. When such Open Sky CompositionsTM are staged within an architectural setting on the ceiling plane, they generate a vivid illusion of open space that engages spatial cognition. A similar framework can also create the illusion of open space on walls.

This cognitive design framework proposes the restorative value of perceived open space in its two essential orientations: the perceived zenith and perceived horizon line. In contrast to how we perceive these spatial reference frames outdoors, in enclosed interiors where such reference frames are often not visible, staging these multisensory cues alters our experience of interior space.

Restoring these fundamental spatial reference frames through a valid multisensory illusion reveals a range of wellness benefits normally associated with interiors applying biophilic design principles.

Objectives

Symbolic versus Multi-sensory Nature Images
Learn about the cognitive differences between representational nature images and multisensory illusions, which include additional spatial cues that generate perceived open space when staged in an architectural setting.
Illusions of Nature and Spatial Cognition
Review the seminal findings of a pioneering fMRI study in neuroarchitecture, Neural Correlates of Nature Stimuli, which revealed that multisensory Open Sky Compositions, in addition to sharing all the activations present in positive images, engage spatial cognition and depth perception.
The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space
Discuss the function that the zenith and the horizon line—two fundamental spatial references frames generated by the sky—play in human perception, including how they influence our subjective assessment of time and how the vastness of the sky deepens our thoughts.
Designing Images to Evoke Spatial Maps
Uncover the neural pathways of memory-formation and how the adept designer can evoke the embedded spatial maps of experienced biophilic environments to create perceived open space in enclosed interiors, generating a restorative impact.
Bringing Biophilic Engagement to Interiors
Discuss the importance of neurologically complex environments—those that provide access to panoramic views to nature—which facilitate cognitive restoration through biophilic engagement.
Sky Factory

Author Information Play Video Bio

Sky Factory
on behalf of The British Institute of Interior Design

David Navarrete MS, MBA manages Sky Factory's research partnerships with healthcare organizations interested in cognitive biophilia studies. He has contributed research articles to Human Spaces, a global forum on biophilic design, and Conscious Cities Journal, a new field of research/practice focused on the neurobiology of design. He is the co-author of Sky Factory’s new RIBA / BIID / USGBC CPD course, The Restorative Impact of Perceived Open Space. The abstract based on these findings will be presented at the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture (ANFA), at the Salk Institute, in September, 2018.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Bill Witherspoon, co-author.

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

Sky Factory is a design studio that custom manufactures virtual skylights and windows. However, the peer-reviewed studies resulting from the company’s collaborative research partnerships have earned the recognition of distinguished professional organizations like the Design & Health International Academy, the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA), and Planetree International, a global patient experience advocacy community. Sky Factory does not influence or play any role in the studies’ execution, data gathering and analysis, report drafting or in the submission process to peer-reviewed journals.

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(18 Apr 2019)
Please could you confirm that this is working as I can't open the link.

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