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2018 ACCP Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Journal CE April | Brompheniramine and Chlorpheniramine Pharmacokinetics Following Single-Dose Oral Administration in Children Aged 2 to 17 Years

2018 ACCP Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Journal CE April | Brompheniramine and Chlorpheniramine Pharmacokinetics Following Single-Dose Oral Administration in Children Aged 2 to 17 Years

2018 ACCP Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Journal CE April | Brompheniramine and Chlorpheniramine Pharmacokinetics Following Single-Dose Oral Administration in Children Aged 2 to 17 Years

Sudam Pathirana, PhD, Shyamalie Jayawardena, PhD and others
Sudam Pathirana, PhD, Shyamalie Jayawardena, PhD and others
on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology

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Launch date: 05 Jun 2018
Expiry Date: 01 Apr 2021

Last updated: 16 Apr 2019

Reference: 189567

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Description

This article describes an age-/weight-based dosing nomogram for brompheniramine maleate and chlorpheniramine maleate in children over ages 2 to 17 years. It characterizes key PK parameters including clearance, volume of distribution and terminal half-life in children using non-compartment analysis (NCA) and assessed how these parameters would change with age and body weight. Finally, is describes the resulting similar systemic exposures across ages using currently proposed dosing nomogram and how this can be used to guide future trials in children.

Objectives

Objective 1:
Describe the impact of age and/or body weight on key PK parameters in children.
Objective 2:
Interpret how these changes can be used to guide dose optimization in the targeted pediatric population.
Objective 3:
Explain the principle of ‘exposure match’ in the dose selection in children across age and weight groups and how this would impact efficacy.
Objective 4:
Analyze the allometry rule and its application in pediatric PK.
Sudam Pathirana, PhD, Shyamalie Jayawardena, PhD and others

Author Information Play Video Bio

Sudam Pathirana, PhD, Shyamalie Jayawardena, PhD and others
on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology

In the 1960s, a group of eminent physicians formulated the concept of an organization dedicated to a new branch of pharmacology that dealt with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in man. As a result of their efforts, the American College of Clinical Pharmacology (ACCP) was founded on September 11, 1969. Today, ACCP consists of a full spectrum of clinical pharmacology professionals from academia, industry, government and clinical settings who span the scope from research and drug development to patient-related care and who remain dedicated to advancing clinical pharmacology with the ultimate goal of enhancing patient care.

As an organization whose primary role is education, ACCP does not concentrate on any one aspect of the discipline. Rather, it seeks to address the educational needs of its diverse membership and all healthcare professionals, covering a range of topics that span the entire area of the interaction between drugs and humans. These areas include, but are not limited to, pharmaceutical chemistry, biochemistry, drug metabolism, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pharmacometrics, pharmacogenomics clinical pharmacology practice in the outpatient and inpatient settings, human toxicology, drug interactions and clinical drug trials. The diversity of ACCP is expressed not only in the composition of its membership, but also in its leadership. Maintaining a balance of elected Regents and Officers from all pertinent professional backgrounds ensures that ACCP remains attuned to the needs of all professionals engaged in the practice of or with a strong interest in clinical pharmacology, from the research laboratory (academic and industrial) to the classroom, and from clinical trials to improved patient care.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

  • Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME)
  • 1.00 Credits
  • Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE)
  • 1.00 Hours -
    Exam Pass Rate: 75

Faculty and Disclosures

Joseph Bertino, PharmD, Editor-in-Chief, JCP

Joseph Bertino, PharmD, Editor-in-Chief, JCP

Bertino Consulting, selected this article and has nothing to disclose.
Yan Xu, MD, PhD, Associate Director, Global Clinical Pharmacology

Yan Xu, MD, PhD, Associate Director, Global Clinical Pharmacology

Janssen Research & Development, developed the continuing education portion of this activity (target audience, goals and objectives and questions with solutions), has nothing to disclose related to this educational topic.
Theodore Xanthos, PhD, MD, Professor of Medicine

Theodore Xanthos, PhD, MD, Professor of Medicine

European University of Cyprus, has nothing to disclose.

Additional Contributors

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

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