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Real ROI: Using RTLS to Improve Pump Utilization and Save $1M

Real ROI: Using RTLS to Improve Pump Utilization and Save $1M

Real ROI: Using RTLS to Improve Pump Utilization and Save $1M

Dave Dickey, CCE, CHC, FACHE, CHTM
Dave Dickey, CCE, CHC, FACHE, CHTM
on behalf of Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society

$30.00 $ 30.00 $ 30.00

$30.00 $ 30.00 $ 30.00

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Launch date: 13 Dec 2018
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Last updated: 23 Dec 2020

Reference: 193068

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Ms ABIGAEL NAKUTI BScN (17 Dec 2020)
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Description

It’s a familiar refrain: clinical staff say they don’t have enough IV pumps. Nurses hide them, units fight over them, and hospitals typically over-purchase on this critical piece of equipment. It was no different at McLaren Flint, where, when it came time to replace its fleet, clinical staff requested a 10% increase in the number of pumps. Operations instead proposed a 33% decrease, going from 900 IV pumps for the 365-bed medical center to just 600. The radical shift came with a plan and a promise — a plan to increase IV pump utilization using a real-time locating system (RTLS), and a promise that if a clinician needed a pump, they would have a pump. Learn how McLaren gained buy-in, kept its promise, and saved $1 million, while gaining an RTLS that will be further leveraged to improve patient flow, staff safety, and the patient experience.

Objectives

Assess the return on investment a real-time locating system can provide on new capital purchases
On completion of this course, the learner will be able to assess the return on investment a real-time locating system can provide on new capital purchases
Discuss methods to gain buy-in from clinical staff when reducing the number of IV pumps in a hospital’s fleet
On completion of this course, the learner will be able to discuss methods to gain buy-in from clinical staff when reducing the number of IV pumps in a hospital’s fleet
Describe how PAR levels are managed with RTLS, including the strengths and weaknesses of current methodology
On completion of this course, the learner will be able to describe how PAR levels are managed with RTLS, including the strengths and weaknesses of current methodology
Dave Dickey, CCE, CHC, FACHE, CHTM

Author Information Play Video Bio

Dave Dickey, CCE, CHC, FACHE, CHTM
on behalf of Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society

Dave Dickey is the Corporate Director, McLaren Clinical Engineering Services, and has been in the healthcare technology management field for the past 39 years. He earned his BS in Electrical Engineering from Michigan State University in 1976, and his MS degree in Biomedical Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 1978. Upon graduation, he became Hurley Medical Center’s (Flint, Michigan) first Biomedical Engineering Director, where he collaborated in funded research projects on non-organic failure to thrive infants while developing the BME program for the 600 bed facility. In 1984, he moved to Washington DC to become Director of Biomedical Engineering at the Washington Hospital Center, where he expanded the department’s role into nontraditional areas such as radiation safety, telecommunications and various shared biomedical services ventures. In 1997, he established Medical Technology Management, Inc., as an independent Clinical Engineering consulting firm, where he assisted over 25 hospitals and medical equipment product manufacturers in the development of their technology service delivery programs. As an outcome of a consulting engagement, Dave joined McLaren Health Care in 2002 as their Corporate Director of Clinical Engineering, where he is currently managing a healthcare technology program (for 12 hospitals) supporting over a half billion dollars of clinical equipment assets; device integration; equipment planning for new facilities; and developing an in-house service model for a proton beam treatment system. In 2006, Dave received his Clinical Engineering Certification from the ACCE-Healthcare Technology Certification Commission, and in 2012 achieved fellow status within the American College of Healthcare Executives. In 2017, he became a Certified Healthcare Technology Manager.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

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User Reviews (3)

Go Back
Ms ABIGAEL NAKUTI BScN (17 Dec 2020)
The content is audible and precise
Ms BEATRICE AWINO BSc (16 Dec 2020)
Informative
Ms ANN MBUTHIA BSc (16 Dec 2020)
important

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