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Crossed Parabolic Cylinder Meridional Maximum Refraction

Crossed Parabolic Cylinder Meridional Maximum Refraction

Crossed Parabolic Cylinder Meridional Maximum Refraction

Gregg Baldwin OD
Gregg Baldwin OD

FREE
FREE
FREE

FREE
FREE
FREE

null FREE
FREE
FREE
null FREE
FREE
FREE
Normal Price: FREE FREE

Review:

Launch date: 24 Jun 2019
Expiry Date:

Last updated: 31 Oct 2019

Reference: 194335

This course is no longer available

Exam is embedded in the course
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Latest User Comments

(20 Aug 2019)
good
Mr DIPIN ANNAMALA (19 Oct 2019)
its a very good topic

I would like to...

Course Availability

This course is only available to trainees days after purchase. It would need to be repurchased by the trainee if not completed in the allotted time period. This course is no longer available. You will need to repurchase if you wish to take the course again.

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Description

This course discusses crossed parabolic cylinder meridional maximum refraction.

Objectives

Discuss the nature of a parabola.
The derivation of its external and internal determining constants will be examined. The relationship of those constants to one another, as well as to the axial radius of curvature will be discussed.
Demonstrate a geometrical approximation of crossed spherical cylinders using crossed parabolic cylinders.
Using parabolic sagitta with a constant sagittal depth as a geometric indicator of curvature, the effects of component curvatures in various meridians will be considered.
Discuss the difference between the meridian of maximum component curvatures, and the merdian of maximum component refraction.
Axial radii of curvature will be expressed in terms of their refractive effects that are additive. These component effects will be summed meridionally and maximized in terms of meridian.
Find the meridian of maximum refraction using the angle between the crossed cylinders.
This method will designate the angle of the crossed cylinders at a point on the circumferece of a circle.
Find the meridian of maximum refraction using twice the angle between the crossed cylinders.
This method will designate twice the angle of the crossed cylinders at the center of a circle.
Gregg Baldwin OD

Author Information Play Video Bio

Gregg Baldwin OD

Gregg Baldwin, OD, optometrist and low vision examiner, the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, 397 Azalea Ave., Richmond, VA 23227; email: [email protected]

1983 graduate of The Ohio State University College of Optometry; previously US Public Health Service commissioned corps; Indian Health Services, Alaska and Arizona.

Current Accreditations

This course has been certified by or provided by the following Certified Organization/s:

Faculty and Disclosures

Additional Contributors

Conflicts Declared

Conflicts of Interest declaration by Author:

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User Reviews (2)

Go Back
(20 Aug 2019)
good
Mr DIPIN ANNAMALA (19 Oct 2019)
its a very good topic

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